Research: People

Current Lab Members

Guillo Gutierrez

Guillo is a physics/political science double major at Ohio Wesleyan. For his senior research project he will be working to develop algorithms to identify influential spreaders in complex networks (continuing the work started by Kelly Fullin). This work will be useful in determining which people should be vaccinated to prevent the spread of a disease, or in quantifying individuals' ability to spread their ideas within a social network. With Guillo's interest in political science, he plans to model influence within the United States Congress.

Joe Emerson

Joe is a physics/computational neuroscience double major at Ohio Wesleyan. He is continuing the project on seizure propagation that he started with Momi Afelin (described below).

Former Lab Members

Momi Afelin

Momi is a double major in Neuroscience and Behavior & Biology from Wesleyan University. As part of OWU's neuroscience REU program, she worked with a theoretical model of seizure generation to explore how meso-scale connectivity structure affects the propagation of epileptic seizures. The goal was to identify principles to determine which specific connections should be severed in order to prevent seizures from spreading, thus improving surgical outcomes for patients with epilepsy.

Kelly Fullin

Kelly is a computer science major/physics minor from Ashland University who participated in OWU's physics REU program in the summer of 2017. She worked on a project to identify influential spreaders in complex networks, and developed an algorithm that quantified the influence of particular nodes roughly ten times faster than brute force simulations.

V Sliupas

For their senior research project, V started the project on seizure propagation that Momi and Joe took over. V graduated from Ohio Wesleyan in 2017.

Eugene Lim

Eugene worked with Kate Holman in the summer of 2015, as well as throughout his senior year, to theoretically demonstrate the possibility of brain rhythms emerging from completely asynchronous neural activity. This work was accepted for publication in The International Journal of Neural Systems.

Kate Holman

Kate worked with Eugene Lim over the summer of 2015 on the project described above. Kate ran simulations to pinpoint exactly how noisy asynchronous neural activity can be before narrowband rain rhythms may no longer be observed. Kate is a co-author on the paper published in The International Journal of Neural Systems, and she is currently finishing her senior year at Towson University.

Jason Kim

Jason worked to design a brain-computer interface during for his senior research project. Click here to see a short demo of the final product. Jason graduated from Ohio Wesleyan in 2015 and is now working to complete a master's degree in electrical engineering at Washington University, where he continues to conduct research with brain-computer interfaces.

Brandon Schurter

Brandon worked in the lab during the summer of 2014 as part of the OWU physics REU program. Brandon continued Mike Leone's project from the previous summer, investigating how the synchronization of neuronal networks is affected by having different mixtures of different kinds of neurons (while keeping network connectivity the same). This work was ultimately published in Physical Review E. Brandon graduated from Berea College in 2015, then took a job as a software engineer with Simmetry Solutions, where he currently works.

Kevin Rossi

During the Fall 2014 semester, Kevin wrote a program in MATLAB to analyze fruit fly sleep behavior. Kevin graduated from Ohio Wesleyan in 2017.

Alex Cook

In the summer of 2013 Alex wrote a program in MATLAB to analyze fluoresence traces recorded from neuronal cultures, helping to automate the identification of neural events. Alex graduated from OWU in 2016 and is now enrolled in Columbia University's graduate program in chemical engineering.

Mike Leone

Mike worked in the lab during the summer of 2013 as part of the OWU physics department's REU program. He started the project that Brandon Schurter completed (described above), resulting in a publication in Physical Review E. After his undergraduate studies, Mike studied Computational Neuroscience at Carnegie Mellon University, and is now enrolled in postbaccalaureate courses at the Harvard Extension School.